Commit 4fb3dc03 authored by Stéphane Adjemian's avatar Stéphane Adjemian
Browse files

Cosmetic changes in section "dates class".

parent 552cbe34
......@@ -8558,7 +8558,9 @@ for monthly dates and 1-52 for weekly dates) are stored in the second
column.
@end table
@noindent Each member is private, one can display the content of a member but cannot change its value:
@example
>> d = dates('2009Q2');
>> d.time
......@@ -8578,13 +8580,17 @@ ans =
@deftypefnx {dates} dates (@code{FREQ})
Returns an empty @dates object with a given frequency (if the constructor is called with one input argument). @code{FREQ} is a character equal to 'Y' or 'A' for annual dates, 'Q' for quaterly dates, 'M' for monthly dates or 'W' for weekly dates. Note that @code{FREQ} is not case sensitive, so that, for instance, 'q' is also allowed for quaterly dates. The frequency can also be set with an integer scalar equal to 1 (annual), 4 (quaterly), 12 (monthly) or 52 (weekly). The instantiation of empty objects can be used to rename the @dates class. For instance, if one only works with quaterly dates, he can create @code{qq} as:
@example
qq = dates('Q')
@end example
and a @dates object holding the date @code{2009Q2}:
@noindent and a @dates object holding the date @code{2009Q2}:
@example
d0 = dates(2009,2);
@end example
@noindent which is much simpler if @dates objects have to be defined programatically.
@end deftypefn
......@@ -8598,7 +8604,6 @@ Returns a @dates object that represents a date as given by the string @code{STRI
@end deftypefn
@sp 1
@deftypefn {dates} dates (@code{DATES})
......@@ -8628,15 +8633,19 @@ do4 = dates('Q',1950, 1);
@sp 1
A list of the available methods, by alphabetical order, is given below. Note that the Matlab/Octave classes do not allow in place modifications: when a method is applied to an object a new object is instantiated. For instance, to apply the method @code{multiplybytwo} to an object @code{X} we write:
@noindent A list of the available methods, by alphabetical order, is given below. Note that the Matlab/Octave classes do not allow in place modifications: when a method is applied to an object a new object is instantiated. For instance, to apply the method @code{multiplybytwo} to an object @code{X} we write:
@example
Y = X.multiplybytwo()
@end example
or equivalently:
@noindent or equivalently:
@example
Y = multiplybytwo(X)
@end example
the object @code{X} is left unchanged, and the object @code{Y} is a modified copy of @code{X}.
@noindent the object @code{X} is left unchanged, and the object @code{Y} is a modified copy of @code{X}.
@sp 1
......
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